Tag:Cleveland Cavaliers
Posted on: October 6, 2011 12:44 pm
 

Dan Gilbert's still making money off of LeBron

Posted by Royce Young



After "The Decision" last June, Dan Gilbert was, well, pissed. He ripped off a now infamous Comic Sans rant proclaiming that LeBron was a traitor and wouldn't win a title before the Cavs. He also pulled a more subtle gesture to take a dig at his former superstar: Gilbert, who owns Fathead, slashed prices on all LeBron Cavalier merchandise to $17.41, which is the year famous traitor Benedict Arnold was born.

History slam.

But via CNBC.com, Gilbert, who profitted greatly from LeBron's time in Cleveland, is back to making money off his sworn enemy.

Before last season, LeBron James decided to opt out of the wall graphic category that is included as part of each NBA player's group licensing agreement. James had a deal with a company to make wall graphics of him, though that company couldn't use NBA marks since the official rights to league marks were exclusive to Fathead.

In the end, the company never did release a James wall graphic and the opt out recently expired.

But on Monday morning, CNBC discovered that Fathead was selling four wall graphics of James in his Heat jersey. What makes the relationship sticky is that the ownership group of Fathead is led by Dan Gilbert, owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers, who LeBron of course left to go to the Heat.

(If you're wondering, Gilbert can continue to sell his Fathead player things during the lockout because the company's deal is with the NBA Players' Association, not the NBA.)

If you're wondering, all the Fathead LeBron stuff is now $17.41 now. It's now $99.99. So Gilbert's obviously made a mends enough in his mind to take advantage of LeBron's starpower to make a little money off him.

LeBron needs to ask himself his favorite question here: What should I do? Should he opt out again just to spite Gilbert? Should he be the bigger man and just let Gilbert make his life-size wall stickers?

I'm a big fan of spite and I think LeBron has every reason to opt out just to stick it to Gilbert. I mean, remember, Gilbert did call LeBron a coward. And then rubbed him losing the NBA Finals in a bit on Twitter. Go for spite LeBron. You've stuck it to Gilbert before, now just do it again.
Posted on: September 30, 2011 1:47 pm
Edited on: September 30, 2011 1:52 pm
 

Darius Miles gets felony charge for airport gun

Posted by Ben Golliverdarius-miles-small

The prosecution thought things through and apparently concluded that bringing a loaded firearm to an airport is, in fact, against the law.

KMOX.com reports that former NBA player Darius Miles will face a felony charge for allegedly bringing a loaded firearm to a St. Louis airport back in August.

Former  NBA player and East St. Louis High School product Darius Miles is facing a weapons charge stemming from a recent incident at Lambert-St. Louis International Airport.

The St. Louis County Prosecutor has charged Miles with one felony count of unlawful use of a weapon. Miles was arrested at Lambert in early August after a Transportation Security Administration screener allegedly found a loaded handgun in his carry-on bag.

According to reports, Miles, 29, was taken into custody following the X-ray screening process revealed the weapon. Handguns may only be transported in checked baggage.

Miles, a lottery pick in the 2000 NBA Draft, played seven seasons in the NBA for the Los Angeles Clippers, Cleveland Cavaliers, Portland Trail Blazers and Memphis Grizzlies. Once a high-fllying athlete at forward, chronic knee problems prematurely ended his career.

For the incident, Miles ranked No. 4 on this summer's NBA Lockout Indiscretion Power Rankings.
Posted on: September 25, 2011 7:54 pm
Edited on: September 25, 2011 7:58 pm
 

Irving still needs three months to be 100 percent

Posted by Royce Young



So maybe THIS is why Dan Gilbert's (reportedly) being so stubborn about a new collective bargaining agreement. He's just trying to hold out to give his No. 1 pick a little time to get completely healthy.

Via the Plain-Dealer, Kyrie Irving is still about three months from being "fully healed" from his broken foot. Don't worry Cavs fans, he's been practicing and conditioning without restriction and even says he's "150 percent."

Irving was still taken No. 1 overall despite only appearing in 11 games at Duke during his freshman season. Why? His talent is pretty much undeniable.

The question is though, what's this mean for the Cavs if the season starts on time Nov. 1? Will Irving trot out as the starter? Will Byron Scott rest him for those couple weeks to get him entirely healthy? Is he eased in? Is Baron Davis the starter and if so, how fat will he be?

Obviously Irving's pretty much fine, but a broken foot isn't something to mess around with. They can alter careers, especially if you have a setback. That's why it's best to take it slow for Irving and make sure that he's completely healed, according to doctors, fans, himself, the janitorial staff -- whoever. You're rebuilding, there's no big rush. It's easy to rag on Baron Davis, but the Cavs do have the luxury of easing Irving into the rotation. They have a proven starter already that can handle the load. Heck, that might be the plan regardless of Irving's health.

So fear not, Cavs fans (and Cavs Dan). Irving probably wouldn't prefer the extra time an extended lockout would give him anyway. I mean, he's only played 11 games over the past year and half. I'm sure he's itching to get on the court again.
Posted on: September 24, 2011 2:36 pm
Edited on: September 24, 2011 2:36 pm
 

First up for each team in a post-lockout world

Posted by Royce Young



So the lockout could be ending soon, depending on who you're listening to. Maybe it extends into the season, but if it doesn't and a deal gets settled in the next few weeks, we're going to have one heck of a free agency period. Really, no matter when it's settled, we're going to have one wild free agency period.

(Unless we were to miss all of 2011-12 and you combined this class with next year's group. Now that would be something.)

If you thought the summer of 2010 was a frenzy, try cramming it all into a two-week period. Maybe I'm just thinking of how horrible it'll be for me. Regardless, you can be sure that all 30 teams have a pre-written itinerary on what they want to accomplish once the lockout is lifted. They have been planning, plotting and preparing to target the players they want or finish up a few final transactions on the roster.

But what's the first order of business for everybody? What's the priority, the thing that each team wants to get done right away? Here's a stab at each team's top job.

Atlanta Hawks: It really appears that the Hawks are ready and willing to let Jamal Crawford walk, but there's still a decision to made whether or not they want to compete for him in the free agent market. He was a key part of the team that made a somewhat surprising run to the Eastern Semifinals and re-signing him could be a priority. Problem is, they don't really have the funds for it.

Boston Celtics: What happens with Jeff Green? The Celtics have already tendered him a qualifying offer, but someone surely will extend him an offer sheet. The Celtics have issues at center still and Glen Davis is unrestricted, but figuring out Jeff Green's situation is probably weighing heaviest on Danny Ainge's mind.

Charlotte Bobcats: The Bobcats made a big splash in the draft, but if that's going to matter, they've got to get Bismack Biyombo on the team. His buyout could still be a major issue and though he says he'll be on the team when training camp starts, that's definitely up in the air.

Chicago Bulls: Wing scorer. Say it with me, wing scorer. Derrick Rose needs help (and an extension) in a big time way and it's up to Gar Foreman and company to find that help. Jamal Crawford maybe? Caron Butler? J.R. Smith if he wasn't in China? Someone has to give Rose a little offensive help and that's the top priority for the Bulls.

Cleveland Cavaliers: First thing? Putting Baron Davis on the scales to make sure he doesn't weigh 300 pounds. After that, there isn't a whole lot to be done in Cleveland. The club's rebuilding around their two lottery picks and you don't want to crowd the roster in a way that stunts their development.

Dallas Mavericks: The defending champs have a whole lot on their plate once the lockout ends. Caron Butler's contract is up. So is J.J. Barea's. So is DeShawn Stevenson's. So is Brian Cardinal's (just kidding -- well it is up, but you know what I mean). But the first order of business for Mark Cuban is to get Tyson Chandler re-signed. Not just that though, but to get him re-signed to a number that makes sense for the make-up of the roster.

Denver Nuggets: Despite the lockout, the Nuggets have kind of been gutted. J.R. Smith, Kenyon Martin and Wilson Chandler are in China until at least March. Danilo Gallinari signed in Italy but has an NBA out. But all of that doesn't matter near as much as getting Nene re-signed. Without Nene, it doesn't matter. With Nene, there's still something worth building around.

Detroit Pistons: The Pistons are kind of trying to quietly usher out the old and bring in some new. Tayshaun Prince is a free agent, but I don't think they care. What'll be most interesting is how they handle Rodney Stuckey. The Pistons drafted Brandon Knight in June with Stuckey already their point guard. Do they want Knight to take over? Do they want to play them together? Share the role? Sorting out Stuckey's future is definitely what Joe Dumars has to do first.

Golden State Warriors: The Warriors could be players in free agency, but really, it's about deciding once and for all if Monta Ellis and Stephen Curry really are the backcourt tandem of the future for the team. If there's a time to move on, it's now when both of their values are still high. The Warriors flirted with dealing Ellis last season but it didn't happen. They're probably planning on revisiting that.

Houston Rockets: First order of business: Properly sending off Yao with a jersey retirement ceremony. After that, the Rockets are fairly settled, though you know Daryl Morey is just itching to pick up a phone and start transacting once the lockout's over.

Indiana Pacers: The Pacers have a number of expiring deals and aren't likely looking to re-sign them (maybe Josh McRoberts, maybe Jeff Foster). Larry Bird has been hunting more pieces to add to his mediocre roster for a while and you can be sure the Pacers are going to target some of the bigger free agent names in this class.

Los Angeles Clippers: Eric Gordon is ready for an extension, but the Clippers better be ready to match any offer DeAndre Jordan gets. You might not think that's a big deal, but forget Chris Kaman. The future of the Clips frontcourt is Blake Griffin and Jordan. You seven-footer from Texas A&M finally started figuring himself out a little last season and he's not far off from becoming a major defensive impact player.

Los Angeles Lakers: Shannon Brown's unrestricted, but he's really not that much of an impact player to be that concerned with. The Lakers might have to focus on how to re-structure the roster to suit a new CBA that could greatly cut into their total salary. Will they have to move Lamar Odom? Metta World Peace? But first things first: Giving Kobe and Mike Brown a proper introduction and letting them figure out the direction of the offense.

Memphis Grizzlies: Marc Gasol. That's it for Memphis. It'd be nice to get Shane Battier back, but it's all about Gasol.

Miami Heat: It's kind of been overlooked, but Pat Riley and the Heat have a busy couple weeks waiting on them. Mike Bibby, Jamaal Magloire, Juwan Howard, Erick Dampier and James Jones are all unrestricted and Mario Chalmers is restricted. It's decision time for the Heat. Do they start restocking with veteran talent or look to get younger and develop?

Milwaukee Bucks: That first practice in Milwaukee is something Scott Skiles has probably been thinking about for a while. "Brandon, this is Stephen. Stephen, this is Brandon." The Bucks have some new talent as Stephen Jackson joins Brandon Jennings, but how will they get along?

Minnesota Timberwolves: Here's what David Kahn's to-do list looks like: 1) Hug Ricky. 2) Hug Darko. 3) Overpay a questionable free agent at a position you already have three guys. What it should look like: 1) Convince Kevin Love somehow to sign an extension. 2) Get rid of Michael Beasley and let Derrick Williams have the starting small forward spot all to himself. 3) Tell Rick Adelman to do his thing.

New Jersey Nets: Kris Humphies is an important piece of business but his re-signing goes hand in hand with the larger thing: Proving to Deron Williams that this is a place he wants to re-sign. The Nets have to take advantage right away of showing Williams they're serious about winning. And you do that by getting him some immediate help.

New Orleans Hornets: It's all about David West for the Hornets. Yes, he suffered a major knee injury last season. But he chose to become an unrestricted free agent and a team like the Nets is likely to come calling quickly. Can the Hornets hang on to Chris Paul's buddy?

New York Knicks: The Knicks have a little bit coming off the books but really they need to try and resist the urge to do something drastic in this free agency period. Which they will because of the big names coming up in 2012. Still, they want to field a solid team for this season -- and Mike D'Antoni needs them too -- so adding a quality veteran to help on the inside would be good.

Oklahoma City Thunder: The young Thunder roster is pretty much entirely set up. But Sam Presti has something to do right away once the lockout ends -- get Russell Westbrook his extension. Presti brought Kevin Durant his at midnight last July to make sure there was no doubt about locking up his superstar. Presti better be stalking Westbrook's house on the whim he lockout ends so he can extend the same treatment to his other star.

Orlando Magic: First order of business for Otis Smith and the Magic? Resume begging Dwight Howard to stay. One way to show it would be to get him some help, but Smith sort of laid those cards on the table last year in the Gilbert Arenas/Hedo Turkoglu trade. So it's back to convincing Howard there's a plan for the future and that it'll get better.

Philadelphia 76ers: Someone is ready and willing to give Thaddeus Young a serious offer, so the Sixers better be ready to match anything and everything.

Phoenix Suns: Steve Nash's trade value will be highest at the beginning of the season, so it's up to Lance Blanks and Robert Sarver to figure out if they're ready to move on. Aaron Brooks is a restricted free agent so if the Suns lock him up by matching an offer sheet, that'll be an indication that the Suns are preparing for life without Nash.

Portland Trail Blazers: The Blazers are in love with Nicolas Batum, so extending him could be the first order of business, but really, the Blazers need to find a new general manager first. And whoever that guy is needs to decide that if for the off chance someone gives Greg Oden an offer, if he's willing to match. Oden already has an $8.8 qualifying offer, which is huge, so once Oden signs that, he'll likely be signing with the Blazers for another year.

Sacramento Kings: The Jimmer-Tyreke backcourt is going to be an interesting experiment, but Marcus Thornton is quietly one of the more intriguing free agents out there. The Bulls are likely looking at him long and hard right now. He's restricted, so the Kings could keep him, but the question is, with Tyreke moving off the ball for good and Jimmer handling the point, is it worth paying Thornton to just have him come off the bench?

San Antonio Spurs: Um, I guess just resume the typical day-to-day of the Spurs. Gregg Popovich is the longest tenured coach with a team and R.C. Buford probably isn't looking to go do anything drastic in this market. The Spurs are definitely aging, but there's not a lot to be done about that right now.

Toronto Raptors: Assuming the Raptors actually have Jonas Valanciunas for next season, Dwane Casey and company have to figure out if he's ready to cover for Andrea Bargnani on the inside. Can those two really play together and handle enough rebounding and defensive duties? The Raptors are in a place where they have to wait and see with some young players and aren't likely targeting any big names in the open market.

Utah Jazz: Most likely, Andrei Kirilenko won't be re-signing with the Jazz. So Kevin O'Connor will have to make a choice when the lockout's over: Does he try and restock a roster that can maybe squeak out the eight-seed, or does he commit to rebuilding around Enes Kanter, Derrick Favors and others and just let them play it out? The Jazz would love to get some wing scoring help, so O'Connor will probably at least look that direction, but we'll have to see how serious he is.

Washington Wizards: It's not an earth-shattering decision, but Nick Young is a restricted free agent. And with his scoring ability, someone is ready to pay him. Do the Wizards want to keep him? Do they want to look elsewhere and maybe target say, Marcus Thornton? Or do they just let Young walk and see what Jordan Crawford's got?
Posted on: September 21, 2011 6:00 pm
Edited on: September 21, 2011 11:07 pm
 

Delonte West 'not proud' of gun arrest

Posted by Ben Golliverdelonte-west


One of the NBA's strangest incidents in recent memory came when free agent guard Delonte West, most recently of the Boston Celtics but then a member of the Cleveland Cavaliers, was arrested while riding a motorcycle with multiple loaded weapons in September 2009. West, who suffers from bipolar disorder, was suspended 10 games for the incident.

At the time, this was a classic "What the heck really happened?" story. West has remained mostly tight-lipped regarding the incident but he recently opened up to Slam Magazine.

In his version of the story, West says he had taken his bipolar disorder medication and was preparing to sleep when he was interrupted by his friends waving the guns around in the basement music studio.
Gassed up from the commotion, West decided it would be prudent for him to relocate the guns to an empty house he owned nearby. So, with his other vehicles blocked in by guests’ cars, and expecting it to be a short trip, he haphazardly loaded up his Can-Am and placed the weapons in a Velcro-type of bag—“not a desperado, hardcase, gun-shooting-out-the-side type case”—and set off.

“I’m on the Beltway, cruisin’,” West says, voice high, emotional and inimitable. “Soon I start realizing I’m dozing in and out. I open my eyes and I went from this lane to that. I’m swervin’, and by the time I wake up, I’m about three exits past my exit.

“There’s this truck flying beside me—” West pauses; this next part is crucial—“and I’m scared to death. So I seen an officer coming up and I try to flag him down. I pull up next to him. He slows down and I get up in front of him. I tell the officer I’m not functioning well and I’m transporting weapons… The rest of the story is what it is. 

“I’m not proud of it,” concludes West, “but it looks way worse than it was.”

Not really. West's explanation doesn't take the edge off at all.

Grown men horsing around with firearms in a house with children present without the gun owner's knowledge? Operating a motor vehicle while under the effects of strong prescription medication? Operating a motor vehicle while transporting firearms while under the effects of strong prescription medication? That's plenty bad.
Posted on: September 15, 2011 10:32 pm
Edited on: September 15, 2011 10:34 pm
 

Dan Gilbert responds to negotiation report

Posted by Royce Young

There was a report earlier Thursday that Dan Gilbert, along with Suns owner Robert Sarver, kind of sort of derailed some growing momentum in the NBA's labor strife. Well, Gilbert responded to that via Twitter. Shocking, I know.



Boy, his rants are a lot more fun when they're in a funny font.

But I have no idea what a "bloggissist" is, but it seems to me like it's a cutdown of some sort. Here's the thing with this whole labor mess: There's a lot of chatter, a lot of spin and a lot of rhetoric coming from about 25 different angles. It's hard to know what's real, what's stretching the truth and what's straight up propoganda.

Writers and "bloggissists" kind of trust readers to be able to sort through the crap and decipher what's legit and what's not. A solid report from a solid reporter like the one from ESPN LA claiming Gilbert and Sarver led the way in shooting down some momentum is believable. Was it likely sourced from a certain side of the aisle? Yeah, most likely. But I doubt it's complete fiction.

Besides, here's what's sad and pathetic: That the NBA is actually in jeopardy of missing games. Try as you might Dan, but you can't dupe NBA fans into believing that whatever battle you're fighting is worth losing games.
Posted on: September 15, 2011 7:10 pm
 

Report: Sarver, Gilbert killed potential deal

Posted by Royce Young



There was a reason for all the budding optimism surrounding Wednesday's labor meeting. There was a little momentum and by a lot of indications, the players and owners were closing the gap to a degree.

But after a five-plus hour meeting in New York, a lot of that optimism was squashed. The reason? Two owners didn't like the way things were heading, according to ESPN LA.

Owners and players initially found reason for optimism during Tuesday's meetings. Commissioner David Stern and Peter Holt, the head of the owners' executive committee, felt that the players' proposal to take 52 or 53 percent of basketball-related income, compared to 57 under the previous agreement, was basically fair, sources said.

Owners were seriously considering coming off of their demand for a salary freeze and would allow players' future earnings to be tied into the league's revenue growth, a critical point for players. The owners also were willing to allow the players to maintain their current salaries, without rollbacks, sources said.

But when the owners left the players to meet among themselves for around three hours, Cleveland's Dan Gilbert and Phoenix's Robert Sarver expressed their dissatisfaction with many of the points, sources said. The sources said that the Knicks' James Dolan and the Lakers' Jerry Buss were visibly annoyed by the hardline demands of Gilbert and Sarver.

That, is kind of hard to swallow. Especially knowing that Gilbert was a soft cap lover as long as he had LeBron. And knowing that Sarver is one owner that doesn't have much of a reputation for caring about his team, instead only about profits.

Now, it might be a bit strong to suggest the two owners "killed" a potential deal because there is still some separation, but they certainly caused a major bump. Still, this is kind of good news. The players and owners are getting close on money, which is a major hurdle. If they can just get lined up on systematic details, we'll get a deal. And that could happen in any meeting.

Maybe next time Sarver and Gilbert don't get their way. Maybe next time, the other heavy hitters come together. Billy Hunter spoke of a divide between owners and while David Stern tried to brush it off, he acknowledged it. The owners are looking at losing a substantial amount of money in a lockout and playing the hardline, stubborn card might not be wise right now. For owners like Buss and Dolan who are making money, I'm sure it would be easy to grow annoyed with that kind of edged approach.

But keep hope. Like I said, while it's bad news, it's also kind of good news. There's movement towards... something. Eventually someone will get overruled and a deal will be struck. It's just a matter of how long all this hardline posturing is allowed to go on.
Posted on: September 5, 2011 1:14 pm
Edited on: September 5, 2011 1:42 pm
 

Realigning the NBA

Posted by Royce Young



Conference realignment has sort of taken over the world the past few weeks. Texas A&M pretty much put the nail in the coffin for the Big 12 by bolting for the SEC and because of it, a whole new chain of events have tipped over. The landscape of college football could look a whole lot different in a few months. Or in a few weeks. Or even tomorrow.

But you know what else could use a little realigning? The NBA's divisions. They're kind of a mess. It's not going to be as a result of some $300 million network, recruiting ties or competitive advantages. Nope. For the NBA, it's more just about common sense. Geographically, the divisions are kind of a mess. In 2011 that's not as huge a deal as it was in 1981 because travel is much easier. You can go from Portland to Oklahoma City in just a few hours.

However, chartered travel is experience. Fuel is very pricey. And with the NBA and teams supposedly losing so much money, why not exhaust every option to cut costs and realign the divisions so they make a lot more sense? Why not group teams together that are hundreds, not thousands, of miles apart?

Plus, it just makes a lot more sense to have structured regions. Grouping teams together based on geography does more to forge rivalries, gives fans a chance to commute between games if the want to and gives the players less travel and more days of rest. All good, right?

So if you're going to spend all this time restructuring a new collective bargaining agreement, why not fix the divisions too? Here's how they should look:

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST
Dallas
San Antonio
Houston
Phoenix
Oklahoma City

The NBA's new Southwest division is the American League East, the SEC West, of the league. It's a group of five teams that are all pretty good. Things change though and in 15 years, this could be the weakest division in the league. But for now, it'd be pretty good.

And it just makes sense. Dallas and Oklahoma City are about three hours via car away from each other. San Antonio, Dallas and Houston are in the same state. And OKC and the Texas teams and Phoenix just have one state separating them, which is a whole lot better than five.

MIDWEST
Memphis
Minnesota
Denver
Utah
Milwaukee

Clearly the division that needed the biggest overhaul is the Northwest, mainly because of the Sonics transformation into the Oklahoma City Thunder. When the team was in Seattle, the division made a lot more sense. Now it doesn't. That's why a midwestern division with makes a lot more sense.

That creates somewhat of a problem in the Northwest though. There's not a great fit. So for the sake of the argument, the Northwest has to make the Big 12 and peace out. No more Northwest, but instead the new Midwest.

The new Midwest is still a bit spread out, but all the teams are at least located somewhat centrally in the country. A trip from Utah to Milwaukee won't be quick, but the Jazz, Nuggets and Timerwolves have been oddballs in the Northwest. It's not an ideal division with teams right next door to each other, but it makes a lot more sense than the current setup.

PACIFIC
Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Clippers
Sacramento
Golden State
Portland

Moving Phoenix away from the Lakers is a bummer, because those two teams are historical rivals that have always competed in the same division. But if A&M and Texas can separate, I think we can live with the Suns and Lakers moving apart.

The Pacific now features five teams that are actually next to the Pacific Ocean, which seems like it should count for something. Plus having the Blazers and Lakers together makes up for separating the Suns and Lakers.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

CENTRAL
Chicago
Detroit
Indiana
Cleveland
Toronto

Really, the new Central was the inspiration for this. Why aren't the Raptors in this division? Look at how close those teams are to each other. I think you could almost ride your bike between arenas. The old Central was really good too -- maybe better -- but the Bucks have to move. So it's the Raptors who replace them and the solid geographic setup remains.

ATLANTIC
Boston
New York
Philadelphia
Washington
New Jersey

Nothing too radical here. Five cities that you can transport between using a train. Old rivalries are preserved and the Wizards are added, which frankly, makes a lot of sense.

SOUTHEAST
Miami
Orlando
Atlanta
Charlotte
New Orleans

Two teams would swap conferences with the Bucks moving back to the West and the Hornets heading to the East. Not that this would upset the competitive balance of the league or anything, but it just makes a lot more sense for the Hornets to be placed in a division with Orlando, Charlotte, Atlanta and Miami.

And let me add this: If college football has no issue tossing tradition and historical rivalries out the window, why not just eliminate conferences all together? It would be a radical move, but what's the point of the East and West, other than just that's the structure of the playoffs? If it were one unified "super" conference, that would finally solve the issues of a 50-win Western team missing the postseason while a 37-win Eastern team slips into the eight-seed.

You could even just build the league into three 10-team divisions. Combine the Southwest and the Pacific, the Midwest and the Central, and the Atlantic and the Southeast. There are your super-divisions. Now you can keep teams playing more in their division than anything else and cut down on long road trips. It would make a West coast road trip for the Mavericks a whole heck of a lot more interesting.

Basically, we'd be looking at a league with three sub-conferences and once the playoffs started, seeding would just be based from that. Almost like the NCAA tournament, you could set two regions and seed from there. Head-to-head tiebreakers, division records and all that stuff would separate any identical records. Just an idea while we're brainstorming, you know?

(Note: I don't really love that idea, quite honestly. But I was just throwing it out there. One of those things that probably makes sense, but wouldn't ever happen. Much like Bill Simmons' terrific "Entertaining As Hell Tournament." Really, a unified conference makes it easier to implicate the tournament too.)

Let's face it: The West has kind of sort of dominated the past decade. Sports operate in cycles, but if there's a way to prevent that, should we? The West compiled a record of 2,257-1,643 against the East from 1999-2008 and over the last 13 seasons has represented 10 champions. That's pretty dominant. That'll change eventually, but what really is the point of the conferences, other than the standard, "that's just the way it's always been done" answer? 

All that is after the fact though: Divisional realignment is the start. Fixing the structure of the postseason would be the ideal next step. It's kind of like a plus-one for college football. Maybe a pipe dream, but something that's really in the best interest of the game. But if anything's to be done, it's to realign the divisions so they at least make a little more sense. Preserve rivalires, start new ones, save money, cut down on travel and hopefully, help the league grow a little bit more.

Picture via Jockpost
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com