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Tag:Zach Randolph
Posted on: January 24, 2012 4:42 pm
Edited on: January 24, 2012 5:35 pm
 

Rudy Gay doesn't need luck, headband or no

Gay has helped the Grizzlies make their own luck.  (Getty Images)
By Matt Moore

Rudy Gay wore a headband Tuesday night against the Warriors for the first time in a long time. He wound up leading a furious comeback by the Grizzlies who closed on a 30-17 run for the win. Gay nailed a tough stepback jumper to give the Grizzlies a clinching three-point lead, and hit a free throw to push the lead to four. He finished with 23 points, 9 rebounds, 4 assists and 3 steals. So yeah, pretty good night for RG. 

So was it the headband? Kind of, but not really. From the Memphis Flyer:  
Toward the end of the brief on-court interview, sideline reporter Rob Fischer asked Gay about his decision to wear a headband during the game, which was a new look for him. Gay motioned back toward the rest of the team with a smile and said, “I wore the headband because the trainer says I always play bad when I wear the headband.” Then Gay looked into the camera, pointed, and channeled his inner Hulk Hogan with a message to viewers at home: “Kids out there, make your own luck. Make your own luck.”
via Road Recap: Grizzlies 91, Warriors 90 — Where the Grizzlies Made Their Own Luck | Beyond the Arc.

I'm never sure on these things, but I think the word is "swag."

Over the last five games, Gay has averaged 21 points, 5 rebounds, 3 assists, 2 steals, and 1 block, shooting 54 percent from the field. It is the kind of stat-stuffing performance that Memphis needs along with the ability to nail huge perimeter shots when the game is on the line.

Those two elements are crucial. Gay's not an elite scorer, but a quality one, not an elite rebounder for his position, but a good one. Defensively is where he shines. His activity and anticipation in the passing lane sparks the fast break for the Grizzlies and that constant pressure is what puts teams on their toes. 

In the Grizzlies' second round loss to the Oklahoma City Thunder, they found themselves in a certain situation time and time again. Low shot clock or game clock, trying to come up with a perimeter bucket due to the attention Zach Randolph drew. Without Gay the Grizzlies had no alternative but to try and manufacture one. But in the NBA, you need a player to rise up and nail a big shot in-between those plays where ball movement is key. Gay was missing from that series, and after all the talk about Memphis being better without him, Gay is putting that talk to rest. The Grizzlies don't rely on one player, but if the entire team can collectively put themselves in a position to win, Rudy Gay is becoming the player to put them over when it counts. 

The Grizzlies have survived the first 20 days without Zach Randolph and are leading the division. When Randolph went down, people said it was bad luck. 

Make your own luck, kids.  



Posted on: January 4, 2012 1:24 pm
 

Zach Randolph out up to 8 weeks with knee injury

Posted by Ben Golliver

After a dream season in 2010-2011, the Memphis Grizzlies are now living a nightmare.

The Memphis Commercial-Appeal reports that Grizzlies star forward Zach Randolph could miss up to two months after an MRI revealed a "slight" MCL tear in his right knee.
Grizzlies forward Zach Randolph will miss up to eight weeks after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that he suffered a slight tear of the medial collateral ligament in his right knee, sources with knowledge of the situation told The Commercial Appeal. The injury will not require surgery and doctors will re-evaluate Randolph in two weeks.
An 8-week absence would mean that Randolph is not available until after the 2012 NBA All-Star Game.

Randolph, a multi-talented scorer and aggressive rebounder, is averaging 14.8 points and 7.5 rebounds per game in four appearances so far this season. For his career, Randolph averages 17.6 points and 9.1 rebounds per game.

Randolph's knee injury, which was originally called a bruise, occurred during a Sunday loss to the Chicago Bulls. Video is below.

Back in April, during Memphis' run to the Western Conference semifinals, the Grizzlies reportedly signed Randolph to a 4-year contract extension worth $71 million. 

Memphis recently lost forward Darrell Arthur to a season-ending injury as well, and reportedly have engaged in a 3-team trade to land Philadelphia 76ers big man Marreese Speights to help address their suddenly thin frontcourt.

Here's video of Zach Randolph's knee injury courtesy of YouTube user NBAUpdater12.


Posted on: September 20, 2011 1:44 pm
 

Year of the Grizzlies



By Matt Moore


To say that every franchise has "that year" that changes everything is just not true. Most franchises take time to develop, to blossom from fledgling to regular to up-and-comer to contender to powerhouse. There are titanic events that shape franchises, to be sure, almost always involving the NBA draft. The Spurs, for example, nabbed Tim Duncan to go along with a recovering David Robinson. That was a game-changer for them, literally. But the Spurs had been a playoff team for years, had been contenders in the ABA and NBA, a team that had developed over time. The Miami Heat had the 2006 year when everything came together, but they had also grown in legitimacy through the Alonzo Mourning era. 

But the Grizzlies?

The Grizzlies are having a year that could remake their franchise as a whole. Okay, maybe it's two years. 

It started with re-signing Rudy Gay in free agency for a max deal. The Grizzlies took a world of flak for the decision, since Gay wasn't considered a max player at the time, nor is he now. But it was a shift for the Grizzlies. It was a change in owner Michael Heisley's previous approach, in that it showed he was willing to spend, and spend heavy, in order to compete. Heisley had taken on water as being cheap since trading Pau Gasol (the last player he gave a significant contract to). There were questions of whether the young, talented roster the Grizzlies had been developing together since that Gasol trade would stay together. Heisley breaking out the wallet signified that if nothing else, Heisley was good to his word. He said he wanted to compete, and that if the team competed, he would spend. Re-signing Gay gave them the opportunity to do so.

Heisley followed that up with what I thought was one of the worst contracts in franchise history, and what turned out to be one of the shrewdest moves in frachise history by extending Mike Conley before he could enter restricted free agency. In doing so, not only did he continue to show he would spend to keep the core together, but he also got Conley for a good value relative to his ability, as the young point guard matured into a floor general and reliable playmaker.

When Gay went down in February, the team had already started to rise. That's what's forgotten in the talk that Gay's injury was the cause for the Grizzlies's surge. the Grizzlies had been playing better since January 1st, going 11-6 in January. They had started to gel before Gay's injury and had Gay stayed healthy, it's not like he was keeping a difference maker off the floor. His minutes were absorbed by second-year player Sam Young, who contributed on both ends of the floor, but wasn't in any way better for the overall team structure than Gay, offensively or defensively.

The Grizzlies made a deadline deal to acquire Shane Battier, dumping franchise dead weight and first-round bust Hasheem Thabeet and an additional pick. They nearly made another deal, but fitting the pattern of good fortune, their deal to trade O.J. Mayo to Josh McRoberts fell through. The result was Mayo sticking around and being a huge part of the Grizzlies' playoff run. At the time, though, it seemed more like the kind of thing the Grizzlies tend to screw up as a habit. 

Nonetheless, the Grizzlies then went on one of the best runs in franchise history, even if the numbers don't bear it out. Consider this. The Grizzlies went 9-5 in March. Not great, but good, right? Here's who they played in March of 2011: Spurs, Hornets, Mavericks, Thunder, Knicks, Heat, Clippers, Knicks, Pacers, Jazz, Celtics, Bulls, Spurs, Warriors. That's eleven playoff teams out of fourteen opponents, with the others the wacky Warriors, the Jazz, and Blake Griffin. To survive that schedule around .500 would have been an achievement. To romp through it with success was what put them over the top and into the playoffs, creating a buffer wide enough to hold off the surging Rockets for the eighth spot.

Then, despite tanking to play the four-time champion San Antonio Spurs coming off one of their best regular seasons in years, the Grizzlies pulled one of the most impressive upsets in NBA history, not only beating the top seed but looking impressive doing it. The first franchise playoff win came in their first playoff game of the season, on the road, on the back of a Shane Battier three.  The Grizzlies would go on to push the mighty and revered Thunder to seven games, proving that the young argonauts were mortal after all. Though the Grizzlies fell, it was in the most respectable manner possible, with the real turning point being a triple-overtime thriller that was decided mostly due to various Grizzlies stars fouling out and not having enough energy left for the rest of the series. 

So that's a pretty great year, right? Except things continue to get better. During the playoff run, Heisley also paid Zach Randolph. Keeping the All-Star of the team on the roster has its ups and downs, considering his later-contract-year money vs. age, but it also provides them with the consistency Randolph's shown for years in being a 20-10 guy, and now a team leader.

But most importantly, this lockout, while harmful towards the franchise's momentum in terms of fan support which has always been tepid in Memphis, could be the best thing of all. A revised CBA could allow for the Grizzlies to keep costs down, stabilizing the franchise's financials and eliminating one of the biggest disadvantages to their efforts, the market inequality that has kept them out of free agency conversations. A revised revenue sharing system would do wonders for the Grizzlies whose television deal pays them a fraction of the larger markets', and even the possibility of shortening the years on existing contracts could help with their long-term financials and flexibility.

There are drawbacks, of course. A hard cap implemented immediately would have devastating impacts on the Grizzlies considering the money they've already shelled out, much less the money necessary to re-sign restricted free agent Marc Gasol. But it's just as likely that a new system could come out favoring the Grizzlies' as much as any team in the league, from a financial and competitiveness standpoint.  

The final piece of the puzzle is Gasol. Re-signing one of the best young centers in the league, who has stated openly his desire to return to Memphis where he went to high school, cementing this core of players that genuinely enjoys playing with one another, could be the component that changes the Grizzlies from newly-respectable to consistent contender, at least for the playoffs. It gives the fans a reason to buy in, a group of players worth getting behind (as the elder Gasol's Grizzlies team never was), and could get owner Michael Heisley off the punchline lists around the league.

There is, naturally, the concern from fans and analysts of the extreme opposite, however. Once the Grizzlies finished their playoff run, my first thought was to wonder if this was similar to the Clippers' 2006 run. The Clippers made a strong showing in the playoffs, advancing to the second round and a close series with the run-and-gun Suns. But the year after, Elton Brand went down and everything tanked. The Clippers became the Clippers again. This is what seems to happen to franchises in the NBA. You're either "there" or you're not. Then again, we thought the latter about the Mavericks for decades until everything changed. Now look at them.

2010-2011 was a good year for the Grizzlies, a great year. 2011-2012 could wind up being the best yet. From ticket sales to on-court performance to the emergence of Gay as a superstar to being respected and feared as a contender, this could wind up being the point in time where the Grizzlies changed the course of franchise history, and forever altered the face of professional basketball in Memphis.  
Posted on: September 8, 2011 12:08 pm
 

Conley organizes Grizzlies workouts

By Matt Moore

The number of ways Mike Conley has impressed me since I torched him upon his signing a $40 million extension continues to grow. I've been wrong about some things. Today. And, well, every day. But I do my best to try and recognize it and adjust accordingly. And Mike Conley continues to bury a knife into my early season criticism of him last year. In short, I look like a moron consistently. Case in point: Conley has taken the lead in organizing team workouts in Memphis during the lockout to work on conditioning, in-game situations, and chemistry. From the Memphis Commercial-Appeal:
Mike Conley decided not to wait for an end to the NBA lockout to direct the Grizzlies.

The point guard took charge and mobilized his teammates for a mini-camp in Memphis this week.

Conley, Rudy Gay, Tony Allen, O.J. Mayo, Zach Randolph, Xavier Henry and Sam Young reunited at a local gym early Tuesday. Ish Smith and second-round draft pick Josh Selby were expected to join the group Wednesday.

"I've been prepared all summer to do this," Conley said. "It's my job as the point guard. I want to be one of the leaders on the team. And guys did a great job of keeping their word and coming in on time ready to work.
via Mike Conley organizes workouts for Memphis Grizzlies » The Commercial Appeal

If you were around the Grizzlies at any point last season even for a game, you'd see Conley's influence as a leader. He stayed the longest at practice most days, he was constantly talking with coach Lionel Hollins, and he was almost always in a position to make sure his teammates were prepared. There were times when his late-game execution and decision making was confusing, but then, he also made some huge plays in those key situations. He's still growing into his role in the NBA and with the Grizzlies, but this is a tremendous example of taking the next step in terms of leadership. Being the guy to get everyone together, to instill discipline, that puts him at another level. 

The roster of those attending is interesting. Randolph had said he wanted to help organize such a workout. Tony Allen coming just shows his commitment. Gay has been active in getting back into his role with the team as he recovers from shoulder surgery. Sam Young is in need of constant coaching to improve his knowledge of where to fit in on the floor. Then there are the others. 

O.J. Mayo electing to join the team is notable in and of itself, after Mayo was nearly traded at the deadline following a short suspension for a banned substance and was involved in a fight with Tony Allen. Mayo recovered and acted professionally on the floor throughout the year, and came through for Memphis in the playoffs. He's also a restricted free agency when the season resumes. But Mayo has spoken about the comfort level he has with this team and it shows. 

Then there's Xavier Henry. Henry was a highly touted lottery pick, who suffered a knee injury, then vanished from the active roster. He was invisible during the playoffs and there have been concerns over his relationship with Lionel Hollins. His working out with the team is a good sign, as he could use some time among the veterans in Memphis, as could Josh Selby, another Jayhawk the Grizzlies drafted. Selby plummeted to the second round after being considered a lottery pick over character and attitude questions. But Selby has also been in good company this summer, playing alongside NBA stars like LeBron James through his connection to Carmelo Anthony's Team Melo, as well as his work at Impact Basketball in Las Vegas. 

Conley is still not an elite point guard in this league and likely will never be. But his consistency and work ethic, along with this kind of leadership shows why that extension wasn't just at good market value, it was probably a steal. If you need me, I'll be in the corner staring at the wall until my detention is up.  
Posted on: September 6, 2011 2:24 pm
Edited on: September 7, 2011 12:09 pm
 

NBA Lockout Indiscretion Power Rankings

Posted by Ben Golliver

walker-critt-marbury

With Labor Day in the rearview and another collective bargaining agreement negotiating session on the slate for Wednesday, the NBA has turned a corner. The long, hot lockout summer is kaput.

Thanks to a relatively weak 2011 NBA Draft and without Summer League or a free agency signing period, this summer was mundane compared to the average NBA summer and a major letdown from the hysterical Summer of 2010. Without player movement and roster restructuring to dominate the headlines, our collective attention turned to empty and half-hearted labor rhetoric, planking, tattoos, sponsor trips to Asia, and street ball games.

And one other thing: player indiscretions, both on and off the court. For years, player conduct has been a hot button issue for the league. With that in mind, we present the authors of the top-10 indiscretions of the 2011 NBA lockout.

Top-10

10. Derek Anderson: Alleged financier of major cocaine operation

The temptation was to leave Anderson, a former guard for a number of NBA teams, including the 2006 NBA Champion Miami Heat, off of this list because of the sketchy nature of his accuser. Ultimately, the scope of the charges leveled against him simply cannot be ignored. In August, convicted killer Francois Cunningham alleged that Anderson bankrolled a major cocaine operation in Louisville, KY. Anderson maintained his innocence, through an attorney, and police have not yet charged him with a crime. Coincidentally, Anderson says on his website that he has a television series in production that is set in Georgia and based off of “The Wire.” Hopefully Anderson won’t be the next Snoop.

9. Latrell Sprewell: Millions owed in back taxes

Sure, failing to pay your taxes is kind of a boring transgression. Either the IRS or the state department of revenue is the aggrieved party and it’s hard for the average person to feel much sympathy for them. The best way to spice it up, though, is to owe so much that you actually lead your state in delinquency. That doesn’t happen every day, but former NBA guard Latrell Sprewell, best known for choking Golden State Warriors coach P.J. Carlesimo and for saying that he needed to ”feed his family” when he turned down a $20 million + contract offer from the Minnesota Timberwolves, finds himself in that exact situation. The state of Wisconsin published a top-100 list of delinquent taxpayers and Sprewell, a Wisconsin native who also played for the Milwaukee Bucks, holds the very top spot, owing the state more than $3 million.

8. Stephon Marbury: Millions owed to bank over failed sneaker company

I know what you’re thinking: the only thing more boring than owing millions in state taxes is owing millions to a bank. Fair point. That would apply in most cases, but former NBA guard Stephon Marbury is, quite obviously, not most cases. The man who got a tattoo on the side of his head and once ate Vaseline on a live internet stream famously launched an eponymous line of discount sneakers back in 2006. His main retail partner went under, the sneakers drew complaints about quality after some initial positive buzz and now Marbury, currently playing professionally in China, is staring at a $16 million loan that needs to be paid back. Anyone know the specifics of Chinese extradition laws?

7. Kendrick Perkins: Arrested after bar brawl in Texas

When this story first broke, it seemed like absolute chaos. When the dust settled it looked far more routine. Perkins, center for the Oklahoma City Thunder, was home in Texas conducting a children’s basketball camp when he decided to go out for a night on the town. That night ended with him behind bars on charges of disorderly conduct and public intoxication after he allegedly attempted to fight the club’s manager. Perkins looks like he is posing for an angry mug shot regardless of what is happening around him so we can assume he was prepared for the incident’s legal aftermath. Through an attorney he has maintained that he is innocent of the charges and that he wasn’t drunk. Still, that was too little, too late, at least by the Thunder’s standards, as the first truly bad headline including the OKC Boy Scouts had been written. Assuming nothing else happens, it will likely be a blip on the radar.

6. Michael Beasley: Marijuana bust and shoving incident with fan

Beasley has the unique honor of being the only active player on this list with multiple indiscretions to his name this summer. The fun began with a relatively routine marijuana bust in July, when Beasley was allegedly caught with marijuana in his car while driving nearly 20 miles over the speed limit. Of course, the circumstances were a bit more serious given that Beasley had previously entered rehab and pledged to his new boss, Minnesota Timberwolves president David Kahn, that he would remain drug-free. Weeks later, Beasley lost his cool during an exhibition game in New York City, shoving a courtside fan in the face after a back-and-forth trash-talking session. The 28 GMs who didn’t bite when the Miami Heat gave him away for nothing last summer all feel vindicated.

5. Zach Randolph: Drug dealer allegedly assaulted at his home

Memphis Grizzlies forward Zach Randolph is the highest-profile current player to find himself in a messy situation this summer. That comes as no surprise to those who have watched his career unfold, as sketchy friends, drug allegations, late-night beatings and the like have seemed to follow him at every stop. In the latest installment, an Oregon drug dealer alleges that Randolph “snatched” his marijuana from him and refused to pay, then watched as Randolph’s friends beat him so badly with pool cues that he had to be hospitalized. Any time your police report reads like a game of Clue– “Associates in the living room with a pool cue” – that’s a really bad sign. Will Randoph ever get a clue? Probably not, and it hasn’t cost him yet, as he just signed a super-rich contract extension with the Grizzlies.

4. Darius Miles: Airport gun incident

Miles, a former teammate of Randolph’s on the so-called “Jail Blazers,” was arrested in the most perplexing and depressing of circumstances. Knee injuries robbed Miles of what should have been the second half of his NBA career and, at 29, he hasn’t touched an NBA court since the 2008-2009 season. In early August, Miles was taken into custody after allegedly trying to take a loaded gun through airport security at St. Louis’ Lambert Airport. That sentence prompts so many questions that it is difficult to know where to begin. Why did he need a gun? Was it for personal protection or image? How could he possibly have thought he would make it through security? If you carry a gun with you for long enough, can you forget you have it with you? And, perhaps most importantly: Is the Darius Miles Story doomed to reach an unhappy ending?

3. Jay Vincent: Jailed on fraud charges

Vincent, childhood friend and former teammate of Magic Johnson at Michigan State and with the Los Angeles Lakers, racked up 413 career steals during a nine-year NBA career. In the twenty years since he retired, Vincent has racked up thousands more. A Michigan court sentenced Vincent to more than five years in jail for his role in an online scam that bilked roughly $1 million out of 20,000 people. During the trial proceedings, Vincent was caught in another alleged scam in which he placed ads for a fake basketball team, charging prospective players a fee for a tryout that never materialized. Not even a plea from Johnson himself could save Vincent from doing hard time.

2. Samaki Walker: Arrested for marijuana and illegal steroid possession

The scope of Walker’s alleged crimes isn’t as grave as many of the others on this list, but it’s certainly the most humorous. Was there a better headline anywhere over the last few months than “Samaki Walker eats marijuana during arrest”? I doubt it. Walker, former Dallas Mavericks lottery pick and member of the 2002 NBA Champion Los Angeles Lakers, was pulled over by police in Arizona and allegedly had 10 grams of marijuana and liquid steroids in his car. His plan to avoid suspicion was simple: make the marijuana disappear from sight by ingesting it. That’s one of those ideas that is either so brilliant it’s stupid or so stupid it’s brilliant. Either way, it didn’t work. At 35, his professional basketball career is winding down, and he claimed he was using the steroids because they were legal in Syria, where he most recently played. Once it’s time to retire, Walker will surely be able to find work playing himself if they ever make a “Dude, where’s my car” sequel.

1. Javaris Crittenton: Charged with murder

This list ends on a terribly tragic note. Crittenton, a former NBA guard best known for his 2009 locker room dispute over a card game with former Washington Wizards teammate Gilbert Arenas that involved guns and saw both players suspended for the season, has been charged with murdering a mother of four in his native Georgia. Police say Crittenton fired at the woman in retaliation for an April robbery in which two men took more than $50,000 worth of jewelry from him at gunpoint outside a barber shop. Crittenton is innocent until proven guilty, but his life will never be the same. And, of course, the life of the victim in the alleged murder, Jullian Jones, has been lost forever.

Dishonorable Mention

Los Angeles Lakers center Andrew Bynum was allegedly caught parking in a handicapped parking space at a grocery store, despite the presence of many unused, normal parking spots just yards away. The act could have subjected him to a minor fine. This one wasn’t really criminal, but it was criminally immature and insensitive.

Future Hall of Fame center Shaquille O’Neal has found himself in the middle of so many bizarre lawsuits this summer – allegations of wiretapping, hiring hit men, ordering murders, kidnapping, sex tapes, you name it – that it’s impossible to place him on this list.

Missed child support payments are, sadly, a common problem for former professional athletes, but Fab 5 member and former guard for the Toronto Raptors and Denver Nuggets Jimmy King put a twist on the situation, finding himself arrested at church by Michigan police. At church? Is nothing sacred!

Los Angeles Lakers forward Matt Barnes punched an opponent during a Bay Area pro-am game and New York Knicks forward Renaldo Balkman headbutted Memphis Grizzlies guard Greivis Vasquez during a FIBA Americas game. Both incidents didn’t quite seem serious enough to crack the top-10.


Posted on: September 3, 2011 8:19 pm
Edited on: September 3, 2011 8:26 pm
 

Pro basketball league takes shape in Las Vegas

Posted by Ben Golliverjohn-wall-dance

About two weeks ago, we brought you early word of an informal league being launched by Impact Basketball, a well-known training facility frequented by NBA players, in Las Vegas. The premise behind the league was simple, but surprisingly foreign: provide a structured, non-NBA environment for professional basketball players to compete during the ongoing lockout.

The New York Times reports that all systems are go for the league, which plans to begin a two-week slate of games on Sept. 12.
The site will be the Impact Basketball gymnasium, about two miles from the Strip. The unofficial commissioner will be Joe Abunassar, a longtime trainer of N.B.A. players. More than 40 players, locked out of N.B.A. facilities because of a labor standoff, have committed to play. Chauncey Billups, John Wall, Zach Randolph and Stephen Jackson will be among the headliners.

“This is an effort on our part to get these guys as ready for training camp as they can get, without going to training camp,” Abunassar said in a phone interview. “That’s the allure of it.”

The tournament has been named the Impact Basketball Competitive Training Series.
The league plans to sell a limited number of tickets to the general public and to provide live video streams of the games online. The Times reports that the following players also plan to participate: Shawne Williams, Iman Shumpert, Kyle Lowry, Chuck Hayes, Chase Budinger, Courtney Lee, Mo Williams, DeAndre Jordan, J.J. Hickson, Eric Maynor, Al Harrington, Jermaine O'Neal and Jared Dudley.

This league sounds like a noble and well-thought out attempt at getting professional basketball off the ground during the lockout, but it doesn't particularly sound like a made-for-TV event (aside from the presence of Wall, who is always made-for-TV, whether he's balling or dancing). The focus seems to be on staying in shape and skill development with a secondary emphasis on building chemistry between teammates. This league will likely have more in common with recent exhibition games or maybe the Las Vegas Summer League rather than an NBA game. The scope will be narrower and the sideshows will likely be non-existent. 

For hardcore hoop heads, that won't matter. But the casual fan likely won't pay this league any mind. Unless, of course, some bigger stars throw their hats in the ring.
Posted on: August 23, 2011 12:41 pm
Edited on: August 23, 2011 5:31 pm
 

Dealer: Zach Randolph 'snatched' pot over price

Posted by Ben Golliverzach-randolph

On Sunday night, we noted reports that Memphis Grizzlies forward Zach Randolph allegedly hosted a party at his Oregon home that ended with a marijuana dealer being hospitalized after he was beaten with pool cues by Randolph's friends.

While Randolph is still not a suspect in the assault, the picture just gets uglier and uglier as details continue to emerge in the case and.

KGW.com reports that the admitted marijuana dealer, James Beasley, says Randolph personally took the marijuana from him prior to the alleged beating that left him bloodied. Why? Because Randolph allegedly didn't want to pay $200.

"[Randolph] got upset about the price. He thought the price was too high," Beasley explained. "He snatched the weed out of my hands, like, aggressively, he snatched it like basically saying, 'I'm taking your weed.'"

4-7 people -- but not Randolph -- then allegedly participated in the beating.

"My face was covered up in blood, my clothes were covered in blood," Beasley told the television station. "They hit me upside the head. Split my eye open with a pool stick."

Beasley's brother, Robert, told KGW that Randolph allowed the beating to commence without intervening.

"I am very, very disappointed," said Robert. "Zach was there and should have stopped it. He could have stopped it.'"

"They beat him up and left him out there," Robert told KOINLocal6.com. "They robbed my brother. They basically beat him, bust him in his head with a pool stick and left him on a dark road by himself for dead." 

KOIN also reported that the family claims the beating left Beasley with "a concussion, stitches and brain swelling."

Beasley's mother, Shikego, told the station that her son had a long-standing relationship with Randolph. 

"It's not like he was your groupie, Zach," she said. "You've been knowing my child. You've been partying with my child."

Posted on: August 23, 2011 12:38 pm
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